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The ideas in this place value lesson are taken from the place value ebook that I sell at MathMammoth.com. Only a few examples of each problem type are shown; you should make more problems of each kind for the student.

Tens and ones place value practice
Free lesson plan from HomeschoolMath.net

Fill in the table.  Think of the '+' sign as "and": 10 + 3 means 10 and 3.

Eleven

 

1 ten 1 one

10 + 1

tens ones
1 1

Thirteen

 

1 ten __ ones

10 + 3

tens ones
1 3

__________

 
 

1 ten __ ones

10 + __

tens ones
   

Sixteen

 
 

1 ten __ ones

10 + __

tens ones
   

__________

 
 

_ ten __ ones

__ + __

tens ones
   

Twenty


2 tens 0 ones

20 + 0

tens ones
2 0

__________

 
 

2 tens __ ones

20 + __

tens ones
   

__________


 

__ tens __ ones

__ + __

tens ones
   

__________

 
 

__ tens __ ones

__ + __

tens ones
   

__________

 
 

2 tens __ ones

20 + __

tens ones
   

Thirty

3 tens 0 ones

30 + 0

tens ones
   

__________


 

__ tens __ ones

__ + __

tens ones
   

__________

 
 

__ ten __ ones

__ + __

tens ones
   

__________

 
 

__ ten __ ones

__ + __

tens ones
   

Forty

__ tens 

40 + 0

tens ones
   

Forty-one

 

4 tens 1 one

40 + 1

tens ones
4 1

Forty-two

 

4 tens 2 ones

40 + 2

tens ones
4  

____________

 
 
 

__ tens __ ones

40 + __

tens ones
   

Fifty

 

5 tens 0 ones

50 + 0

tens ones
   

____________

 

__ tens __ ones

50 + __

tens ones
   

____________

 
 

__ tens __ ones

___ + __

tens ones
   

Seventy-eight

 

__ tens __ ones

___ + __

tens ones
   

____________

 
 

__ tens __ ones

___ + __

tens ones
   

____________

 

__ tens __ ones

___ + __

tens ones
   

____________

 
 

__ tens 0 ones

___ + 0

tens ones
   

____________

 
 

__ tens __ ones

___ + __

tens ones
   

Hundred

1 hundred and  
0 tens 0 ones

100 + 0 + 0

hundreds tens ones
1


Example problem types

1. Make a number line from 0 till 40.  Practice counting aloud upwards and downwards with your teacher.

2. Make a number line from 40 till 80.  Practice counting up and down with your teacher.

3.  Fill in the missing numbers on the number lines.
 

__|____|____|____|____|____|____|____|____|____|____|_
  67

 

__|____|____|____|____|____|____|____|____|____|____|_
                                                        83

 

4.  Fill in the missing parts on the number chart. 5. Which is more?  Use matches or base ten blocks if you need to.

 0 

                 
  11                
              27    
      33            
                48  
            56      
        64          
          75        
    82              
                  99

3 tens

2 tens 9 ones

8 tens 1 one

OR

OR

OR

6 tens

6 tens 2 ones

3 tens 9 ones


6.  What number is...

one more than 18?

one less than 39?

two more than 16?

two less than 28?

ten more than 25?

ten less than 40?

You can use the chart to help.  You can make a game out of this, too!

 

7.  a)  Make a number line from 0 to 40. 

b)  Make a number line from 50 to 100.

 

8.  Each ten-pillar has tens little cubes.  Fill in the table.  Write each number also as an addition.

 
 

 5 tens 7 ones

50 + 7 = ___

__ tens __ ones

___ + __ = ___

 
 
 

__ tens __ ones

___ + __ = ___

 
 
 

__ tens __ ones

___ + __ = ___

 
 
 

__ tens __ ones

 ___ + __ = ___

 
 

__ tens __ ones

 ___ + __ = ___

9.  Match the number to its name.

46

70

59

forty-six

fifty-nine

seventy

79

76

100

seventy-six

seventy-nine

hundred

10.  Break the numbers down to their tens and ones and write as addition.

73 = 20 + 3

70 = __ + __

45 = __ + __

72 = __ + __

50 = __ + __

55 = __ + __

 

11.  Do the same the other way around!  Add.

60 + 7 = __

80 + 0 = __

4 + 50 = __

9 + 50 = __

90 + 9 = __

1 + 60 = __

 

12.  For each underlined number, find the number that is exactly 1 ten and 1 more.  Write that number down and encircle it.  What pattern do you notice - where is that number on the chart in relation to the underlined number?

 

                   
10 11             18  
                   
                   
      43            
            56     59
        64          
                   
    82     85        
              97    

 

13.  What numbers go on the empty lines?

a.  88, 89, ___, ___

c.  ___, ___, 71, 72

   

f.  ___, ___, 66, 67

h.  ___, 80, ___, 82

   

j.  41, ___, ___, 44

l.  ___, 78, ___, 80

 

14.  Circle the number that is more.  If it is difficult, write down how many tens and ones the numbers have and represent them with base ten blocks, or with matches with ten-bundles.

18 15
20 17
19 20
 
78 40
22 25
68 80
 
62 59
37 73
16 63

 

15.  Can you build these numbers?

a)  This number has two more tens than 40 has, and the same amount of ones as 17.
 
e)  This number does not have any ones, and has two less tens than 66.
 

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