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The ideas in this place value lesson are taken from the Math Mammoth Place Value 2 book I have written. Only a few examples of each problem type are shown; you should make more problems of each kind for the student.


Comparing three-digit numbers
Free lesson plan

Which is more?  Circle the number that is more.

 

OR

 

3 hundreds 3 tens 6 ones = 336

1 hundred 6 tens 3 ones = 163

 

OR

 

__ hundreds __ tens __ ones  = ___

__ hundreds __ tens __ ones = ___

Do we first compare
how many HUNDREDS the numbers have or 
how many TENS the numbers have or
how many ONES the numbers have?
  1. We compare first the ______________________.
    For example, 652 is less than 701, because 652 has less hundreds than 701.
     

  2. If the numbers have the same amount of hundreds, 
    then we compare the _____________

    For example, 652 is greater than 639 because though it has the same amount
    of hundreds, it has more ________ than 639.
     
  3. If the numbers have the same amount of hundreds AND the same amount 
    of tens, then we compare the _____________.

    For example, 652 is less than 655 because though it has the same amount
    of hundreds and the same amount of tens, it has more _________.

Remember, the open end or open mouth of the symbols < and > ALWAYS 
points to the bigger number.

 

Example problem types

1.  For each number, draw big squares to represent the hundreds, sticks to represent the tens, and dots to represent the ones.  Then write either  <  or  >  in between the two numbers.  

   
         
       

 
       
     

 145

154

   
   
       

 

 234

194

 160

170

 244

424

404

244

112

211



2.  Mark the numbers on the number line.  Then write them in order.

513, 530, 489, 468, 596, 606, 560, 466, 506, 516

[number line available in the ebook]

____ < ____ < ____ < ____ < ____ < ____ < ____ < ____ < ____ < ____

 

810, 725, 799, 802, 843, 795, 810, 801, 866, 829

[number line available in the ebook]

____ < ____ < ____ < ____ < ____ < ____ < ____ < ____ < ____ < ____

 

3.  Write either < or > in between the numbers.

[a]

159   <  300

200      190

400      499

[b]

212      284

312      231

759      394

[c]

150   <  515

240      750

500      499

[d]

412      284

153      315

232      302

 

4.  Write a number that is in between the two given numbers.  Note there are many possibilities!

140 < ___ < 149

267 < ___ < 289

279 < ___ < 290

568 < ___ < 654

799 < ___ < 804

156 < ___ < 158

 
5.  Arrange the number triplets in order.

a)  140, 156, 149

140 < 149 < 156

b)  239, 286, 133

 

c)  109, 901, 199

 

d)  717, 175, 177

 

 

6. Find your way through the maze!  The rules are: you can move either left, right, or down, provided that the number following is BIGGER than the number in the square you're in.

100 121 127 133 167 189 200 214 212 398
145 166 134 135 120 230 212 256 347 405
156 167 137 156 155 226 356 378 380 407
632 234 138 246 267 278 476 477 450 417
432 256 200 250 245 300 355 487 478 456
355 253 289 244 305 303 570 569 490 453
361 385 377 367 356 301 537 566 505 498
689 654 390 480 478 488 675 507 508 689
654 543 489 488 483 577 589 609 504 769
723 566 570 589 578 734 631 616 789 1000

 

7.  Compare the expressions and write <, >, or =.

300 + 60 + 5

   365

300 + 4

   300 + 40
   

8 + 600 

  60 + 800

30 + 300 + 5

   90 + 8 + 100
   

40 + 4 + 600 

  20 + 800

30 + 7 + 700

   700 + 70 + 3

 

8.  Write numbers on empty lines so that the comparisons are true.   For some problems there are many possible answers.

750 + ___ 

 >   757      

645 

 =

 600 + 5 + ___

 

 ___ + 4 

 =  304

2 + __ + 100 

 =

 152

 

 __ + 60 

 <  500 + 60 30 + __   > 

 40 + ___



MYSTERY NUMBERS
(all numbers are less than 100)

a)  It is the same whether you read it from left to right or from right to left.  It is less than 100, but more than 92.
 
b)  The digits of this number add up to 9. It is more than 50 but less than 60.
 
e)  It is less than 10.  If you double it, you get a number that is more than 10, but you won't get 14, 18, or 12. f)  It is less than 15 but more than 9.  If you count by fives from this number, you will eventually hit 36.
 
 

The ideas in this place value lesson are taken from the place value ebook that I sell at MathMammoth.com. Only a few examples of each problem type are shown; you should make more problems of each kind for the student.

Practice makes perfect. Practice math at IXL.com

Free math worksheets and practice - Adapted Mind



Practice makes perfect. Practice math at IXL.com